Newsletters

Poems Grown in the Fields

Posted by on 8:23 am in Newsletters | Comments Off on Poems Grown in the Fields

Poems Grown in the Fields

RaabAs daylight stretchesin comes an awakeningerupting new growth A flower’s missionsending bright stalks to the skyand just before bloomWe free them from timesweet, tender from stem to leafa farmer’s haven Crane Wings spread wide and liftover a vast flooded fieldsunlight reflectingOff water, blindingthe farmer driving the trucktoward distant cornersShe doesn’t see ittwo loose feet floating belowthe bird as it lands Tulips Bright green trianglesrippling and stretching skywardescape the earth first Leading the way forheaven’s...

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An Exciting Start to the Season!

Posted by on 9:31 am in Newsletters | Comments Off on An Exciting Start to the Season!

An Exciting Start to the Season!

Welcome to Red Dog Farm’s 2024 CSA Program! Thank you for your support this season and trust in us to grow you some stellar vegetables, tulips and berries to nourish you, your family and friends.  Here on the farm, we are so excited about this season. As the crew harvested today, we all commented that this is one of nicest first shares we can remember. Lucky you! Thanks to our greenhouses and hard-working crew, we are so pleased to have so many fresh greens for you so early. This past winter brought us the second-lowest temperature I’ve...

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Thank You for a Wonderful Farming Year!

Posted by on 9:38 am in Newsletters | Comments Off on Thank You for a Wonderful Farming Year!

Thank You for a Wonderful Farming Year!

It’s hard to believe another season has come to an end already! This year concludes Red Dog Farm’s 16th season. You’d think that after 16 years, we would have figured out just about everything there is to know about growing and selling produce, but alas there are always more lessons to learn, trials to undertake and new projects to begin!This year felt like a big learning year for me and the farm. I’m tired and ready for rest now, but already there is a spark of energy to take the lessons learned this season and apply them to making...

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Gear for a More Pleasant December

Posted by on 9:36 am in Newsletters | Comments Off on Gear for a More Pleasant December

Gear for a More Pleasant December

The crew comes from a diverse background with varied amounts of experience working outdoors. With the winter rain in the forecast, we should all remember the motto of “no bad weather, just bad gear.”To start from the ground up, one would be wise to get a pair of rubber boots and a couple layers of socks. Hiking boots don’t usually come up high enough, and they can be hard to clean. A basic rubber boot can get a daily or weekly washing, and won’t cost too much either. As for socks, I prefer wool under a cheap cotton sock. Cotton...

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Harvest Moon Kale Caesar Salad

Posted by on 9:33 am in Newsletters, Recipes | Comments Off on Harvest Moon Kale Caesar Salad

Harvest Moon Kale Caesar Salad

Frost covers the grass and fields and fog lays heavy in the valley on this brisk morning. Lately these farm days have felt like a window to what this winter will bring, as it lays right around the corner. And with the frost also comes the time for big shifts on the farm as we have less to harvest from the fields and more to pack from our stored crops. Standing in the center of our packshed this morning you can see all the various root vegetables, squash, and currently an abundance of fennel all being processed and looked over before getting...

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A Day in the Life

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A Day in the Life

When people come up to us at the farmers market or when I tell someone I’m a “farmer,” they often ask, “What does that mean? Like, what do you do?” I understand this question. It’s the same thing I’m wondering when someone tells me they have a tech or finance job. Because my answer is usually “we do all of the farm work,” I thought I might take the time to shed some light on what we (the general farm crew) actually do here. The thing is, it changes a lot. In the early springtime, we are doing a ton of seeding: shoving a bunch of...

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Lessons from Winter Plants

Posted by on 8:51 am in Newsletters | Comments Off on Lessons from Winter Plants

Lessons from Winter Plants

As the winter sun grows increasingly meager into November, so does our crop diversity here at the farm. Beds of cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts have given all they can and are turned over to cover crop to replenish the fertility of the soil. This grassy mixture of oats, triticale, vetch, and crimson clover sways across the fields like a green sea as the warmth and light dwindle.Some of the plants start to bolt, moving into their next life cycle, redistributing their energy away from the leaves and roots to produce seeds and a...

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Change of Seasons

Posted by on 8:44 am in Newsletters | Comments Off on Change of Seasons

Change of Seasons

Last week, a heavy frost covered the Chimacum Valley. It was a sight to behold, with bushes and grasses in an early morning white. This of course meant that there were things for the farmers to attend to and navigate as the proof of a change of seasons greeted the morning commuters.The first thing was that some of the harvests had to be adjusted so as to let leafy greens thaw out. Instead, produce that was normally harvested in the afternoon, such as beets, got a morning visit from our hard-working (and a bit chilly) crew. The beet...

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Tilth: A Conference for Farmers

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Tilth: A Conference for Farmers

Farmers are great at embracing what might seem like paradox: for example, taking advantage of modern scientific research in the ancient act of agriculture, or simultaneously using technologies built half a century apart. We even sometimes leave the fields for an event that is usually associated with corporations or sci-fi superfans: a conference. Tilth Conference 2023 was held last weekend at Fort Worden, and drew agriculture professionals from across Washington State and Oregon. Attendees came from farms, farmers markets, food hubs,...

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A Brief History of Squash and Celeriac

Posted by on 10:59 am in Newsletters | Comments Off on A Brief History of Squash and Celeriac

A Brief History of Squash and Celeriac

It’s sort of strange to think of vegetables as not “always” having been the way that they are – that all of them began as some wild, sometimes unrecognizable version of what they are today, carefully (or, perhaps, recklessly) bred into the delicious treats we get to eat today. This week, I did a bit of research on two of our crops: squash and celeriac. I hope you enjoy. The first squash was cultivated about 8-10,000 years ago in modern-day Mexico. It is thought that their hard shells were initially used as utensils and containers before...

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